"it Would Seem" Vs "it Seems"

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The Free Dictionary Language au-79.nets»English»English Grammar»"It would seem" vs "It seems"

I read news lớn learn english. I see such statement:(About a person)He went on: "It would seem the problem ..."I"m thinking about this "It would seem" it is here like "It seems"I wonder - are both similiar? Is the "It would seem" more natural?
It would seem (that) the problem ..."I"m thinking about this "It would seem" it is here lượt thích "It seems(that)"In these sentences, it seems & it would seem are interchangeable without change in the meaning! Cheers!
I read news to learn english. I see such statement:(About a person)He went on: "It would seem the problem ..."I"m thinking about this "It would seem" it is here like "It seems"I wonder - are both similiar? Is the "It would seem" more natural?
I think there is a difference in these two possible versions of the sentence.In the first, "it would seem" is using the seventh defined meaning of would (from TFH):would aux.v. Past tense of will 7. Used to lớn indicate uncertainty: He would seem to lớn be getting better.So the speaker is saying that he is not sure, but it may be that the problem is ....Whereas, if you use "it seems", I would take that khổng lồ mean one of the following, probably meaning 3 (again from TFD):seem intr.v. seemed, seem·ing, seems 1. To give the impression of being; appear: The child seems healthy, but the doctor is concerned.2. To appear khổng lồ one"s own opinion or mind: I can"t seem lớn get the story straight.3. To appear to be true, probable, or evident: It seems you object khổng lồ the plan. It seems like rain. He seems to lớn have worked in sales for several years.4. To appear to lớn exist: There seems no reason khổng lồ postpone it.So using this construction, the speaker would be stating his opinion in a more positive way.The difference between the two is quite a small nuance of meaning.

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I understand the difference lớn be somehow substantial -"it would seem" for "uncertainty" & "it seems" for opinion.
I read news khổng lồ learn english. I see such statement:(About a person)He went on: "It would seem the problem ..."I"m thinking about this "It would seem" it is here lượt thích "It seems"I wonder - are both similiar? Is the "It would seem" more natural?
I think there is a difference in these two possible versions of the sentence.In the first, "it would seem" is using the seventh defined meaning of would (from TFH):would aux.v. Past tense of will 7. Used to indicate uncertainty: He would seem to be getting better.So the speaker is saying that he is not sure, but it may be that the problem is ....Whereas, if you use "it seems", I would take that to mean one of the following, probably meaning 3 (again from TFD):seem intr.v. seemed, seem·ing, seems 1. To give sầu the impression of being; appear: The child seems healthy, but the doctor is concerned.2. To appear lớn one"s own opinion or mind: I can"t seem khổng lồ get the story straight.3. To appear to lớn be true, probable, or evident: It seems you object to lớn the plan. It seems like rain. He seems khổng lồ have worked in sales for several years.4. To appear to exist: There seems no reason to lớn postpone it.So using this construction, the speaker would be stating his opinion in a more positive way.The difference between the two is quite a small nuance of meaning.
Marcin và KaNNaYou are both welcome, & thank you for your replies. It"s always nice khổng lồ hear if one"s efforts have been of help.
Nancy is quite right. This kind of construction is one of the reasons that learning a language is indivisible from learning the culture of the speakers of that language.We speak a lot here about the differences between American và British English, but it goes beneath the surface of saying "boot" or "trunk", or "elavator" and "lift".Americans, on the whole (how can one generalise an entire population?) are more direct than English (I use that word rather than British deliberately.) The English once used to lớn be known for being polite. Ridiculously so, in some eyes. But even today the vestiges of this remain in the language. We are not direct. We deprecate. We circumlocate. We always say please and thank you. To say "I want an ice cream" could have major pitfalls. The person we say it lớn might think we expect THEM to get us an ice-cream. They might not have any change on them & so be embarrassed. They might be tired and the walk to the cửa hàng with us might exhaust them. They might be on a diet and want khổng lồ avoid the temptation. So we say things lượt thích "How bởi you feel about getting an ice-cream?" or "Would an ice-cream hit the spot?" và turn it inlớn a question. Being direct could cause offence. To say: "You burnt the school down." is an accusation. It leaves no room for doubt. So we say "It appears you burnt the school down." Lots of wiggle-room there. Not an accusation - so it leaves room for "you" lớn put their case and shows we are being jolly fair about the whole thing.In the same way we say, in a work situation "It seems we have sầu a slight problem." rather than "You twit. You just brough the whole bloody factory to lớn a shuddering halternative text."Saying "The problem is....." is a direct, unequivocable statement. "It seems the problem is...." might still be interpreted as the speakers judgement. "It would seem the problem is" takes it nicely inlớn the completely passive sầu và absolves us of responsibility.I guess the average person is completely unaware of this tendency which still exists even in Business-speak & amongst educated speakers và on certain BBC documentaries và newscasts. Its just become a convention và most people don"t even think about the why"s and wherefores of this peculiar speech pattern. It also, I expect, is what gives rise to lots of people thinking the English talk funny... or quaintly or irritatingly. Or, as the blunter Aussies might say are "up themselves". I find it fascinating.
Nancy is quite right. This kind of construction is one of the reasons that learning a language is indivisible from learning the culture of the speakers of that language.We speak a lot here about the differences between American & British English, but it goes beneath the surface of saying "boot" or "trunk", or "elavator" & "lift".Americans, on the whole (how can one generalise an entire population?) are more direct than English (I use that word rather than British deliberately.) The English once used lớn be known for being polite. Ridiculously so, in some eyes. But even today the vestiges of this remain in the language. We are not direct. We deprecate. We circumlocate. We always say please & thank you. To say "I want an ice cream" could have major pitfalls. The person we say it lớn might think we expect THEM khổng lồ get us an ice-cream. They might not have any change on them and so be embarrassed. They might be tired và the walk to the shop with us might exhaust them. They might be on a diet và want to avoid the temptation. So we say things like "How bởi vì you feel about getting an ice-cream?" or "Would an ice-cream hit the spot?" & turn it inlớn a question. Being direct could cause offence. To say: "You burnt the school down." is an accusation. It leaves no room for doubt. So we say "It appears you burnt the school down." Lots of wiggle-room there. Not an accusation - so it leaves room for "you" lớn put their case và shows we are being jolly fair about the whole thing.In the same way we say, in a work situation "It seems we have a slight problem." rather than "You twit. You just brough the whole bloody factory lớn a shuddering halternative text."Saying "The problem is....." is a direct, unequivocable statement. "It seems the problem is...." might still be interpreted as the speakers judgement. "It would seem the problem is" takes it nicely inkhổng lồ the completely passive & absolves us of responsibility.I guess the average person is completely unaware of this tendency which still exists even in Business-speak & amongst educated speakers và on certain Đài truyền hình BBC documentaries and newscasts. Its just become a convention & most people don"t even think about the why"s & wherefores of this peculiar speech pattern. It also, I expect, is what gives rise lớn lots of people thinking the English talk funny... or quaintly or irritatingly. Or, as the blunter Aussies might say are "up themselves". I find it fascinating.
I just registered khổng lồ say that more than fascinating I find that "neat": I can assure that khổng lồ hear someone speaking with an educated English accent is almost as beautiful as hear somebody toàn thân speaking in French (may be the most beautiful language on Earth).The differences between the English spoken on the Islands và the one spoken on the U.S. are abysmal, you guys makes out the good speaking, the good manners và the care of details almost a ritual while, on the other hand, the gringos are nasal, squeaky and greasy.The U.S. surely made their part in helping make the English language be the de fackhổng lồ "World Language" (sorry Esperanto) but you guys makes it sound beautiful.On a side note I apologize for any barbarism I could commit while writing this và I will be most grateful that in case there are any -or some!- you please note them so I can learn where I "bloody" screwed it up =DCheers.
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FounDit
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 12:47:34 AM
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*snip*I just registered khổng lồ say that more than fascinating I find that "neat": I can assure that lớn hear someone speaking with an educated English accent is almost as beautiful as hear somebody toàn thân speaking in French (may be the most beautiful language on Earth).The differences between the English spoken on the Islands và the one spoken on the U.S. are abysmal, you guys makes out the good speaking, the good manners & the care of details almost a ritual while, on the other hvà, the gringos are nasal, squeaky & greasy.The U.S. surely made their part in helping make the English language be the de facto "World Language" (sorry Esperanto) but you guys makes it sound beautiful.On a side note I apologize for any barbarism I could commit while writing this & I will be most grateful that in case there are any -or some!- you please note them so I can learn where I "bloody" screwed it up =DCheers.
msx,I"m delighted khổng lồ see you took the time lớn register and become a member of the au-79.nets, and may I be the first to lớn bid you welcome. That you expended the effort to vị so for the apparently genuine desire and express purpose of labeling us here in the U.S. as gringos, nasally, squeaky, & greasy, says much about you. Thank you so much for your opinion.In accordance with your wishes, I am sure other members on the diễn đàn will be quick to point out any barbarism you might display, as we all strive sầu khổng lồ be helpful here. Just one quiông chồng question, however. Do you believe you have sầu the acumen to lớn recognize it when we bởi so? Just a thought.
Hello msx
, & welcome to lớn the au-79.nets.If I interpret FounDit"s response correctly, it would appear that you struông chồng a nerve. You are entitled lớn your opinion but the "…nasal, squeaky and greasy" epithet is rather blunt.

Xem thêm: Tóm Lại " How You Like That Là Gì ? How You Like That

I thank you for your compliments on the "educated English accent" và what you said about the French language (although my personal favourite is Italian) but you should perhaps exercise a little more diplomacy if you intkết thúc to post on this diễn đàn in the future.
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leonAzul
Posted: Wednesday, June 26, 2013 7:36:50 AM
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Zombies want brains.
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Hi, I""ve sầu just registered lớn say that I m ashamed on you!
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an Argentine"person behaving lượt thích that! You are nothing but a sepoy brown noser! Of course you don t know what it means, vị you? Have sầu you ever been in England? that s what I ve thought! Have you ever been in The States? among muốn working class people? THEY SPEAK THE REAL ENGLISH, not "your" queen" s jargon. You are entitled to sustain your opinion provided you had gone to lớn both places, if not, leave it here, just bla bla bla in a au-79.nets. I love sầu America, I love Baltimore people who have welcomed me và helped me in my darkest days. Excuse my laông xã of English, it is enough lớn express how I feel, though.
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Drag0nspeaker
Posted: Thursday, June 27, 2013 5:00:42 PM
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Hi Silvie!
It"s good to have sầu you on the au-79.net (even if I am English!)
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Johnson Ding
Posted: Saturday, February 25, 2017 12:30:25 PM
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it"s just fun lớn see people fighting against each other !hahaha. especially for the subject like that: language. It would seem that people speaking english has more wiggle room to lớn think và express various subject than a bloody fact of the truth that the only three things we care here are money, money and money (quite importamt that it needs khổng lồ be mentioned three times)appreciated the decent answer from the difference between it seems and it would seems, an concerned opinion and the rest of the fun part. here is so much fun .
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The Free Dictionary Language au-79.nets»English»English Grammar»"It would seem" vs "It seems"

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